NightTime Tea - Product Info

INGREDIENTS:

  • Organic Chamomile

  • Organic Passion Flower

  • Organic Valerian Root

  • Organic Peppermint Leaf

  • Organic Lemon Balm

  • Organic Juniper Berries

     

MEDICINAL ACTIONS:

Chamomile: (Matricaria recutita)

  • Mild nervous system sedative, anti-spasmodic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, anti-emetic, carminative, anti-microbial, vulnerary, anti-ulcer, anti-allergic (1)

  • Constituents: Volatile oil (alpha bisabolol, azulene, chamazulene & matricin), sesquiterpenes lactones, coumarins (umbelliferone), salicylic acid, choline, fatty acids, mucopolysaccharides, flavonoids (apigenin, luteolin, quercetin) (1)

 

Relevant Research:

“The dried flowers of chamomile contain many terpenoids and flavonoids contributing to its medicinal properties. Chamomile preparations are commonly used for many human ailments such as hay fever, inflammation, muscle spasms, menstrual disorders, insomnia, ulcers, wounds, gastrointestinal disorders, rheumatic pain, and hemorrhoids” (2)

“Animal studies show that chamomile contains substances that act on the same parts of the brain and nervous system as anti-anxiety drugs.”(3)

 

References:

(1) https://thenaturopathicherbalist.com/herbs/m-o/matricaria-recutita-chamomille/

(2) Srivastava JK, Shankar E, Gupta S. Chamomile: A herbal medicine of the past with bright future. Mol Med Rep. 2010;3(6):895-901. doi:10.3892/mmr.2010.377

(3) https://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-chamomile.html

 

Passion Flower: (Passiflora incarnata)

  • Antispasmodic, sedative, hypnotic, hypotensive, vasodilator, cardiotonic, bitter, diuretic, anti-depressant, nervine relaxant, anxiolytic, analgesic (1)

  • Constituents: Alkaloids (harman, harmoline), flavonoids (vitexin, saponarin, luteolin, rutin, kaempferol, quercitin), fatty acids (linoleic, linolenic, palmitic, oleic, myristic), acids (formic & butyric), sugar, gum, coumarins, cyanogenic glycosides, volatile oil, chrysin (1)

 

Relevant Research:

“Passionflower is commonly utilized to respond to insomnia, aiding transition into a natural sleep without any “narcotic” hangover. Passionflower works directly on the central nervous system to help lull us to sleep. It is important to note that Passionflower will not force sleep, but rather supports normal sleep that may have been disrupted by stress, muscle spasms, etc.” (2)

“Passionflower has the most defined sedative effect of all the nervines. It is extremely effective in cases of circular thinking that cause insomnia. “I have had patients tell me it’s like they have a talk radio station on in their heads and they can’t find the off switch,” said David Winston. “Passionflower is the off switch” (2)

 

References:

(1) https://thenaturopathicherbalist.com/2015/09/13/passiflora-incarnata/

(2) https://www.herbrally.com/monographs/passionflower

(3) Winston, David & Maimes, Steven. (2019). Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief - Updated and Expanded -2nd Edition.

 

Valerian Root: (Valeriana officinalis)

  • Nervous system relaxant, hypnotic, hypotensive, anxiolytic, analgesic, antibiotic, expectorant, bitter, carminative, sedative (paradoxical stimulant), antispasmodic, emmenagogue (1)

  • Etymology: The latin derivation, valere, meaning “to be strong” or brave, or “to be well” (2)

  • Energetics: Warm, moving, slightly drying (2)

  • Constituents: Volatile oil (camp hene, borneol), sesquiterpene alkaloids (valerenic acid), Iridoid esters (valepotriates), alkaloids (actinidine, valerine, valerianine, chatinine) (1)

 

Relevant Research:

“Research literature contains a fair amount of positive evidence for using V. officinalis to treat insomnia, but not to treat acute and chronic anxiety. One study investigated the use of an aqueous solution of V. officinalis to enhance sleep quality in male participants (n=128). The best results were experienced by men who were more than 40 years old, and those who rated themselves as poor or irregular sleepers who thought they had long sleep latencies. In that group, a 3:1 extract of V. officinalis was associated with a significant decrease in sleep latency scores and improvement in sleep quality. Dream recall, sleepiness the next morning, and night awakenings were unaffected” (3)

“Valerian preparations have been associated with few side effects. Most studies have noted comparable rates of adverse effects in valerian- and placebo-treated patients. There is no evidence for significant abuse potential, and daytime sedation appears to be relatively uncommon” (6)

 

References:

(1) https://thenaturopathicherbalist.com/2015/09/14/valeriana-officinalis/

(2) https://www.herbrally.com/monographs/valerian

(3) https://restorativemedicine.org/library/monographs/valerian-root/

(4) Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 1982;17(1):65–71. Aqueous extract of valerian root (Valeriana officinalis L.) improves sleep quality in man. Leathwood PD, Chauffard F, Heck E, Munoz-Box R.

(5) Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2004;77(2):399–404. Sedative and sleep-enhancing properties of linarin, a flavonoid-isolated from Valeriana officinalis. Fernández S, Wasowski C, Paladini AC, Marder M.

(6) Andrew D. Krystal. Pharmacologic Treatment of Insomnia: Other Medications. Principles and Practice of Sleep Medicine (Sixth Edition). 2017 (88); 842-854.e5

 

Juniper: (J. communis)

  • Diuretic, Anti-inflammatory properties, Antifungal activity, Analgesic activity, Hepatoprotective activity, Anti-diabetic, Anti-hyperlipidemic activity, Antimicrobial activity, Anti-oxidant activity, anti-hypercholesterolemic activity, anti-bacterial activity, anti-cataleptic activity, and neuroprotective

  • Constituents: Volatile oil, with resin, sugar, gum, water, lignin, wax and salines, Juniper contains monoterpenes (which make up most of the essential oil) - alpha- and beta-pinene, sabinene, limonene, terpinen-4-ol, alpha-terpineol, borneol, geraniol, myrcene, camphene, camphor, alpha-eudesmo and many others. It also containes sesquiterpenes - namely beta-caryophyllene, delta-cadinene, farnesol, gamma-elemente, gamma-muurolene, humulene, pregeijerene and many others (2)

 

Relevant Research:

“Ingested forms of juniper assist with inflammation and increase production of stomach acid, making them useful remedies to help soothe the gastrointestinal system. It is a helpful treatment for conditions such as upset stomach, heartburn, flatulence, bloating, loss of appetite, gastrointestinal infections, and intestinal worms.” (1)

“Juniper also alleviates problems associated with menstruation” (1)

 

References:

(1) https://www.herbwisdom.com/herb-juniper.html

(2) https://www.rjwhelan.co.nz/herbs%20A-Z/juniper_berries%20.html

(3) Bais S, Gill NS, Rana N, Shandil S. A Phytopharmacological Review on a Medicinal Plant: Juniperus communis. Int Sch Res Notices. 2014;2014:634723. Published 2014 Nov 11. doi:10.1155/2014/634723

 

Lemon Balm: (Melissa Officinalis)

  • Adaptogenic, Anti-fungal, Anti-bacterial, Anti-depressant, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-Oxidant, Anti-protozoal, Anti-viral, Carminative, Cardio-tonic, Nervine, Sedative, Uterine Stimulant (1)

  • Combinations: If something more cooling is needed to balance the heat of ashwagandha for your body type, pair with rose or lemon balm (3)

  • Constituents: Flavonoids, phenolic acids, tannins, triterpenes, essential oil and sesquiterpenes. Of note, the herb contains citronellal, caffeic acid, eugenol, rosmarinic acid and choline (2)

 

Relevant Research:

“A lemon balm extract was found to have significant virucidal effects against HSV-1 within 3 and 6 hours of treatment in vitro and in animal tests. The volatile oils from Melissa officinalis have also been shown to inhibit the replication of HSV-2 in vitro.” (2)

“The plant extract exerts analgesic activity at high doses in vivo. Two constituents in lemon balm have documented anti-inflammatory activity, achieved through different mechanisms of action. Rosmarinic acid, a naturally occurring constituent found in Melissa officinalis, inhibits several complement-dependent inflammatory processes. Eugenol, another important component, inhibits COX-1 and -2 activities in vitro. Both the whole volatile oil and its main component citral have demonstrated antispasmodic ability on isolated rat ileum.” (2)

 

References:

(1) https://herbpathy.com/Uses-and-Benefits-of-Lemon-Balm-Cid669

(2) http://medicinalplants.us/lemon-balm-background-actions

 

Peppermint Leaf: (Mentha piperita)

  • Carminative, antispasmodic, aromatic, diaphoretic, anti-emetic, nervine, anti-septic, analgesic, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, decongestant, anti-tussive, peripheral vasodilator, choleretic, cholagogue, emmenagogue, anti-pruritic (1)

  • Constituents: Volatile oil (2%) containing methol, menthone and jasmone, tannins, bitter principle, Phenolic acids (rosmarinic, chlorogenic, caffeic), flavonoids (luteolin, rutin, hesperidin), gum, resins, nutrients (carotenes, choline, vitamin E, minerals) (1)

 

Relevant Research:

“In vitro, peppermint has significant antimicrobial and antiviral activities, strong antioxidant and antitumor actions, and some antiallergenic potential. Animal model studies demonstrate a relaxation effect on gastrointestinal (GI) tissue, analgesic and anesthetic effects in the central and peripheral nervous system, immunomodulating actions and chemopreventive potential. Human studies on the GI, respiratory tract and analgesic effects of peppermint oil and its constituents have been reported.” (2)

“In the past, studies have shown that Mentha piperita essential oil and ethanol extracts possess antiviral (2), antibacterial (3, 4), antifungal (3), and anti-biofilm formation (5, 6).”

 

References:

(1) https://thenaturopathicherbalist.com/herbs/m-o/mentha-piperita/

(2) McKay DL, Blumberg JB. A review of the bioactivity and potential health benefits of peppermint tea (Mentha piperita L.). Phytother Res. 2006 Aug;20(8):619-33. doi: 10.1002/ptr.1936. PMID: 16767798.

(3) https://thesunlightexperiment.com/herb/peppermint

(4) E. C. Herrmann Jr. and L. S. Kucera, (1967). “Antiviral substances in plants of the mint family (labiatae). 3. Peppermint (Mentha piperita) and other mint plants,” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 124, no. 3, pp. 874–878

(5) S. Kizil, N. Hasimi, V. Tolan, E. Kilinc, and U. Yuksel, (2010). Mineral content, essential oil components and biological activity of two mentha species (M. piperita L., M. spicata L.), Turkish Journal of Field Crops, vol. 15, no. 2, pp. 148–153

(6) M. Sandasi, C. M. Leonard, and A. M. Viljoen, (2010). The in vitro antibiofilm activity of selected culinary herbs and medicinal plants against Listeria monocytogenes, Letters in Applied Microbiology, vol. 50, no. 1, pp. 30–35