Slimming Tea - Product Info

INGREDIENTS:

  • Organic Ashwaghanda

  • Organic Green Tea Leaf

  • Organic Lemon Balm

  • Organic Holy Basil

  • Organic Milk Thistle

  • Organic Dandelion Leaf

  • Ginseng Oolong

     

MEDICINAL ACTIONS:

 

Ashwaghanda: (Withania somnifera)

  • Adaptogen, alterative, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitussive, aphrodisiac, anxiolytic, bitter, diuretic, immunomodulator, thermogenic, sedative, stimulant (3)

  • TCM: Kidneys and heart. Yang tonic (3)

  • Studies: in vitro and animal experiments suggest effects on the immune, endocrine, and CNS systems, as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer and inflammatory conditions (1, 2)

  • Combinations: for stress and burnout, pair ashwagandha with milky oats to soothe the adrenals. If something more cooling is needed to balance the heat of ashwagandha for your body type, pair with rose or lemon balm (3)

 

Relevant Research:

“Individuals have taken ashwagandha for centuries for the relief of numerous different ailments. Ashwagandha benefits are useful to treat stress, poor memory, low libido, anxiety problems, joint pain, fatigue, sluggishness, difficulty concentrating, problems sleeping, frequent bouts of illness, low mental and physical endurance, and neurological abnormalities.

“Ashwagandha is reported to be beneficial for patients who have problems with frequent constipation, goiter, intestinal parasites, hormone imbalances, general weakness, disability in old age, insomnia, nerve conditions, high cholesterol, sexual dysfunction, tumors, and difficulty managing blood sugar.” (1)

 

References:

(1) https://www.bestherbalhealth.com/ashwagandha-benefits/

(2) https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-953/ashwagandha

(3) https://www.herbrally.com/monographs/ashwagandha

 

Green Tea Leaf (Camellia sinensis)

  • Antioxidant, Diuretic, Neuroprotective, CNS stimulant, Chemoprotective, Hypocholesterolemic, Antiatherosclerotic, Hypoglycemic, Antibacterial, Antiviral, Antitumor (4)

  • Constituents: Green tea contains catechins polyphenols, carotenoids, tocopherols, ascorbic acid (vitamin C). Green tea likewise contains minerals such as chromium, manganese, selenium and zinc, and other phytochemical compounds. (3)

 

Relevant Research:

“Tea has been used for medicinal purposes in China and Japan for thousands of years.”

“Green tea as a beverage or dietary supplement is promoted for improving mental alertness, relieving digestive symptoms and headaches, and promoting weight loss. Green tea and its components, including epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), have been studied for their possible protective effects against heart disease and cancer.” (1, 2)

 

References:

(1) https://www.nccih.nih.gov/health/green-tea

(2) https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-960/green-tea

(3) http://www.medicalhealthguide.com/herb/greentea.htm

(4) https://thesunlightexperiment.com/herb/tea

 

Milk Thistle: (Silybum marianum)

  • Antioxidant, Blood purifier, Brain Enhancer, Immunity Booster, Liver tonic, and Nervine (5)

  • Constituents: Silymarin (a group of flavonoids (flavone lignans) including Silibinin, Silidanin, and Silychristin), Tyramine, Histamine, Gamma linoleic acid, Essential oil, Mucilage, Flavonoids, Dehydrosilybin, Desoxy-silydianin, Silybinomer, Betaine, Trimethyglycine, Amines, Sterols, Campesterol (2)

  • TCM: Silybum Adans (marianum) – Liver, Heart. Cirsii Japonici – Liver, Spleen (2)

  • Combinations: A potent liver tonic recipe combines milk thistle seeds, dandelion root, artichoke, and turmeric root. This combination heals, soothes, detoxifies and gently stimulates the liver. (see purifying tea)

 

Relevant Research:

“Many of these clinical studies have demonstrated that this herb supports healthy liver function and provides powerful antioxidant protection. A primary constituent of silymarin called silibinin also helps to support healthy liver function, encouraging healthy cholesterol synthesis by the liver.*” (1)

“Arab herbal medicine has a tradition of using milk thistle to treat infertility, poisoning, sexual dysfunction and liver disease” (2)

“Silymarin may help the liver metabolise oestrogen more efficiently to reduce symptoms endometriosis.” (4)

 

References:

(1) https://www.gaiaherbs.com/blogs/herbs/milk-thistle

(2) https://www.whiterabbitinstituteofhealing.com/herbs/milk-thistle/

(3) Phytotherapy Research. 2018 ; 32(10): 1933-1949. Silybum marianum (milk thistle) and its main constituent, silymarin, as a potential therapeutic plant in metabolic syndrome: A review. Tajmohammadi, A.

(4) https://drsarahbrewer.com/herbs/milk-thistle-seed-benefits?cn-reloaded=1

(5) https://herbpathy.com/Uses-and-Benefits-of-Milk-Thistle-Cid1648

 

Dandelion Leaf: (Taraxcum officinale)

  • Antioxidant, Diuretic,

  • Constituents: Overall, dandelion is a rich source of minerals, particularly potassium, as well as iron, magnesium, zinc, potassium, manganese, copper, choline, selenium, calcium, boron and silicon, and a rich source of vitamins A, C, D and B complex (US Department of Agriculture 2003). The relatively high protein, fibre and linoleic acid content of dandelion leaves has led to suggestions that dandelion is a nutritious and under-utilized food source. Dandelion’s constituents also include triterpenes, flavonoid glycosides and various phenolic acids, as well as phytosterols, sugars and mucilage. The many phenolic acids and flavonoids include chicoric acid (dicaffeoyltartaric acid) and quercetin glycosides. (1)

  • Combinations: A potent liver tonic recipe combines milk thistle seeds, dandelion root, artichoke, and turmeric root. This combination heals, soothes, detoxifies and gently stimulates the liver. (see purifying tea)

 

Relevant Research:

Dandelion is, I’m convinced, one of the great tonic herbs of all times. The entire plant is restorative and rejuvenating” (Gladstar, 2001, pp. 326)” (2, 3)

“Also, dandelion’s beneficial action on the liver can be of help for balancing hormonal production and clearing skin conditions such as acne and eczema (Gladstar, 1993 & Tilgner, 1999).” (2, 4)

“Dandelion is also useful for overall stagnation in the body with symptoms of poor skin with a dull color, slow or poor digestion, lethargy or fatigue, swollen or inflamed tissues and organs, and poor circulation. In these cases, dandelion works by helping to move the blood and eliminating toxins from the body” (5)

 

References:

(1) http://medicinalplants.us/dandelion-background-actions

(2) https://theherbalacademy.com/a-family-herb-dandelion/

(3) Gladstar, Rosemary. (2001). Rosemary Gladstar’s Family Herbal. North Adams, MA: Storey Books

(4) Gladstar, Rosemary. (1993). Herbal Healing for Women. New York, NY: Fireside

(5) https://www.herbanwellness.net/2010/09/29/dandelion-root-leaf-herb-3-in-my-14-days-of-herbs-series/

 

Lemon Balm: (Melissa Officinalis)

  • Adaptogenic, Anti-fungal, Anti-bacterial, Anti-depressant, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-Oxidant, Anti-protozoal, Anti-viral, Carminative, Cardio-tonic, Nervine, Sedative, Uterine Stimulant (1)

  • Combinations: If something more cooling is needed to balance the heat of ashwagandha for your body type, pair with rose or lemon balm (3)

  • Constituents: Flavonoids, phenolic acids, tannins, triterpenes, essential oil and sesquiterpenes. Of note, the herb contains citronellal, caffeic acid, eugenol, rosmarinic acid and choline (2)

 

Relevant Research:

“A lemon balm extract was found to have significant virucidal effects against HSV-1 within 3 and 6 hours of treatment in vitro and in animal tests. The volatile oils from Melissa officinalis have also been shown to inhibit the replication of HSV-2 in vitro.” (2)

“The plant extract exerts analgesic activity at high doses in vivo. Two constituents in lemon balm have documented anti-inflammatory activity, achieved through different mechanisms of action. Rosmarinic acid, a naturally occurring constituent found in Melissa officinalis, inhibits several complement-dependent inflammatory processes. Eugenol, another important component, inhibits COX-1 and -2 activities in vitro. Both the whole volatile oil and its main component citral have demonstrated antispasmodic ability on isolated rat ileum.” (2)

 

References:

(1) https://herbpathy.com/Uses-and-Benefits-of-Lemon-Balm-Cid669

(2) http://medicinalplants.us/lemon-balm-background-actions

 

Holy Basil: Tulsi (Ocimum sanctum)

  • Adaptogenic, Anti-arthritic, Anti-coagulant, Anti-diabetic, Anti-inflammatory, Anti-diarrheal, Antimicrobial (including antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal, and more), Antioxidant, Hepatoprotective (7)

  • Constituents: Eugenol (a volatile oil), ursolic acid (a triterpenoid), and rosemarinic acid (a phenylpropanoid). Other active compounds include caryophyllene and oleanolic acid, carotenoids, vitamin C, calcium, iron, zinc, and chlorophyll. (10)

 

Relevant Research:

Ocimum sanctum protects organs and tissues against chemical, physical, and metabolic stresses and helps optimize blood glucose, blood pressure, and lipid levels. It protects against psychological stress through positive effects on memory and cognitive function and through its anxiolytic and antidepressant properties. Several of its most studied constituent groups, the ocimumosides and the cerebrosides, display anti-stress effects by normalizing hyperglycemia, plasma corticosterone, plasma creatine kinase, and adrenal hypertrophy.” (1)

Ocimum sanctum can lower elevated cortisol and may potentially regulate corticosteroid-induced diabetes mellitus. The seed oil has been shown to modulate both humoral and cell-mediated immune response” (1)

“Holy basil has been used medicinally in India for over 3,000 years and it’s known there as the “Queen of Herbs”. It has been one of India’s most important healing plants throughout history. Its other name is Tulsi” which means “incomparable one” as, according to Ayurveda, the herb also has effect on the spiritual aspects facilitating expanded states of awareness. Others call it an “elixir of life” as it promotes longevity and relaxation or a “rasayana”- a herb that nourishes a person’s growth to perfect health, both physical and spiritual.” (8,9)

 

References:

(1) https://restorativemedicine.org/library/monographs/holy-basil/

(2) J Ayurveda Integr Med. 2014;5(4):251–9. Tulsi - Ocimum sanctum: A herb for all reasons. Cohen MM.

(3) J Nat Prod. 2007;70(9):1410–6. Constituents of Ocimum sanctum with anti-stress activity. Gupta P, Yadav DK, Siripurapu KB, Palit G, Maurya R.

(4) J Ethnopharmacol. 2002;80(1):15–20. Evaluation of immuno-modulatory potential of Ocimum sanctum seed oil and its possible mechanism of action. Mediratta PK, Sharma KK, Singh S.

(5) Pharmazie. 2004;59(11):876–8. Hypoglycaemic effects of some plant extracts are possibly mediated through inhibition in corticosteroid concentration. Gholap S, Kar A.

(6) https://plantmedicines.org/ayurvedic-holy-basil-tulsi-herb/

(7) https://www.verywellhealth.com/holy-basil-4766587

(8) https://www.naturimedica.com/holy-basil-key-herb-stress-anxiety-depression-fatigue/

(9) Antifatigue Activity of Ethanolic Extract of Ocimum sanctum in Rats; MP Venu Prasad, Farhath Khanum; Research Journal of Medicinal Plant, Year: 2012 | Volume: 6 | Issue: 1 | Page No.: 37-46

(10) https://www.donnieyance.com/holy-basil-an-herb-with-incomparable-benefits/

 

Ginseng Oolong: (Panax quiquefolium)

  • Anti-inflammatory, cardiovascular, central nervous system protection, anti-diabetic, and anti-neoplastic (5)

  • Constituents: The major bioactive components of P. ginseng are the ginsenosides, a group of saponins with dammarane triterpenoid structure (Huang 1999). Almost 50 ginsenosides have been isolated from P. ginseng root (white and red ginsengs), and novel structures continue to be identified, particularly from Panax quinquefolius (American ginseng) and Panax japonica (Japanese ginseng) as well as their berries (Gillis 1997; Yoshikawa et al. 1998; Attele et al. 2002; Christensen 2009).

 

Relevant Research:

“The pharmacological effects of ginseng have been demonstrated in cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and have been used for promoting immune function, central nervous system (CNS) function, relieving stress, and for its antioxidant activities (Jung and Jin 1996).” (2, 3)

“Korean Panax ginseng C A Meyer is mainly used to maintain the homeostasis of the body, and the pharmacological efficacy of Korean ginseng identified by modern science includes improved brain function, pain-relieving effects, preventive effects against tumors as well as anti-tumor activity, enhanced immune system function, anti-diabetic effects, enhanced liver function, adjusted blood pressure, anti-fatigue and anti-stress effects, improved climacteric disorder and sexual functions, as well as anti-oxidative and anti-aging effects.” (4)

 

References:

(1) https://www.botanical-online.com/en/medicinal-plants/american-ginseng-properties

(2) Wee JJ, Mee Park K, Chung AS. Biological Activities of Ginseng and Its Application to Human Health. In: Benzie IFF, Wachtel-Galor S, editors. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition. Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press/Taylor & Francis; 2011. Chapter 8.

(3) Jung N. P, Jin S. H. Studies on the physiological and biochemical effect of Korean ginseng. Korean J Ginseng Sci. 1996;20:431–71

(4) Choi KT. Botanical characteristics, pharmacological effects and medicinal components of Korean Panax ginseng C A Meyer. Acta Pharmacol Sin. 2008 Sep;29(9):1109-18. doi: 10.1111/j.1745-7254.2008.00869.x. PMID: 18718180.

(5) https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/biochemistry-genetics-and-molecular-biology/ginseng